Creating Space in the Hip Joint

This post is related to AIS but is also very important in “technique free” body context. It relates to the hip socket. In one of the exercises that we were doing at the AIS workshop, a cross body leg stretch that used the adductors (inner thigh) to stretch the abductors (side of the buttocks/hips) one student commented that she felt a binding sensation in her hip.

She was fairly flexible anyway and so she was probably reaching the limit of active mobility-the point at which the muscles that she was using to move the leg got in the way of the leg itself. (Like someone moving a big piece of furniture backed up against the wall so that neither they nor the piece of furniture can move any further.)

One potential solution to this is to learn how to “reach” out of the hip socket.

The feeling is similar to that of spreading the shoulder blades. With your arms out to the sides if you spread your shoulder blades (causing the shoulders to move forwards on the ribcage) the arms reach further out to the sides. Maximum reach is when your collar bones, upper arms bones and forearm bones are all more or less in one line.

Obturators and
Gemellus

With respect to the pelvis and thigh bone, we can actually use muscle to pull our thigh bone out of the hip socket. The amount of movement is small but perceptable. To perceive the action simply put your awareness in the area of your hip socket. When standing you can try pushing you pelvis up off of your thigh bones. When sitting with your legs forwards you can push your thigh bones forwards away from your pelvis (or you can push your pelvis back away from your thigh bones.) When standing you use the obturators and gemellus to lift you pelvis off of the thigh bones.

With your legs forwards it is more likely that it is the psoas and obturator externus that does this action. With the leg forwards and crossing to the opposite side it is possible the pectineus, psoas and/or adductor brevis that does this action.

While this action is useful when you find that your hips are binding you may find that in some situations it isn’t openess that you need rather it is stability.

Creating
Stability and
Choice

If you want more stability in the hip joint you can the opposite and pull your thigh bones into your hip sockets. This feels like you are “sucking” your thigh bone into the hips socket. This can be a handy action is you are balancing on one leg. You can stabilize the hip of the standing leg. With the free leg you can try both actions to see which one is more suitable.

Being able to do both of these two actions you can choose from among them. You can keep your hip stable when it needs stability and you can create space in your hip joints when they need room to move.